Redlands Conservancy
HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROGRAM (HPP)

Victorian cottage, 1903, restored by Redlands Conservancy in 2003.
Victorian cottage, 1903, restored by Redlands Conservancy in 2003.

PURPOSE:
We save old houses and buildings. Not just any old house or building, but ones that meet our criteria that they may be salvageable and that their preservation will benefit the neighborhood by maintaining the historical integrity of the area.

MISSION:
The Redlands Conservancy Historic Preservation Program (RCHPP) seeks to preserve the historic, historical, and noteworthy built environment that gives Redlands its distinguishing character, and to foster an appreciation and understanding of the value of preservation through community education. 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS:
1. Partnered with the Redlands Community Music Association to launch the preservation and renovation project of the Mission Gables Bowl House in the Smiley Historic District.

Historic Barton House, saved from demolition by Redlands Conservancy members, adaptively reused by Dr. Terry Vines.
Historic Barton House, saved from demolition by Redlands Conservancy members, adaptively reused by Dr. Terry Vines.

2. Contributed funds to the A.K. Smiley Public Library tower re-construction project.

3. Purchased a 1903 cottage on Alta Street to rescue from demolition; renovated and sold to first-time home buyer in April 2003.

4. In progress: Partnered with Historical Glass Museum Foundation to relocate and renovate an 1888 Victorian house to become the new exhibit space for the Museum.

5. In progress: Opening partnership with North Redlands Visioning Committee to pursue a project to renovate the historic Terrace.

ACTIVITIES
The HPP Committee members involve themselves in several activities to accomplish our purpose. We

Historic Barton House, saved from demolition by Redlands Conservancy members, adaptively reused by Dr. Terry Vines.
Mission Gables
Bowl House, under restoration for use as restrooms and offices for Redlands Bowl.
1) locate and buy old houses and buildings;
2) restore old houses using local construction companies;
3) offer the restored homes for sale with occupation agreement with new buyer;
4) establish a working relationship with the neighborhood;
5) develop educational programs to inform residents about the value and means of renovation and preservation;
6) consult with property owners about viable ways to preserve their homes;
7) conduct fund-raising events.

For information about joining or contributing to this committee, contact the project manager, Sherli Leonard, (909) 389-7810, or info@redlandsconservancy.org.

Marten Andersen House Relocation and Renovation Project

Tower at A.K. Smiley Public Library, re-built in 1998 after 1930s demolition for earthquake safety. Victorian Cottage - Restore in  2003 Marten Andersen House on the move, February, 2006. Marten Andersen House at its new location. The Terrace, an historic linear park in north Redlands: anticipated restoration, 2007.
Tower at A.K. Smiley Public Library, re-built in 1998 after 1930s demolition for earthquake safety.
Victorian cottage, restored in 2003.
Marten Andersen House on the move, February, 2006.
Marten Andersen House at its new location.
The Terrace, an historic linear park in north Redlands: anticipated restoration, 2007.

 

 

Redlands Conservancy Adaptive Reuse Award

The Redlands Conservancy recognizes excellent adaptive reuse projects which preserve worthy buildings in Redlands. The award, to be given periodically, is given to the building owner who renovated the building for a new use. The Historic Preservation Program Committee reviews candidates according to the selection criteria below. Recipients are presented with a plaque which acknowledges their excellent efforts. No money is given with this award.

Selection Criteria:
An Adaptive Reuse Award candidate building must demonstrate that

  1. the exterior architectural integrity has been preserved;
  2. visible modern improvements (e.g., air conditioning, electronic supplies) are reasonably constrained;
  3. high quality, environmentally sensitive materials have been used in the renovation;
  4. the interior historic integrity has been preserved;
  5. the building is representative of a historically significant event, time period, and/or person.

The evaluation process, while reliant on these weighted criteria, is subject to the discretion of the Historic Preservation Program Committee.

2006 winners:

Statistical Research  
W.I.T Windows and Doors
 
W.I.T Windows and Doors - Award
Most recent winner: Statistical Research, Inc., formerly the Grigsby’s building, adaptively reused by Donn and Janet Grenda.   Old wooden church on Colton Avenue, adaptively reused by W.I.T. Windows and Doors, Mike and Norma deDoes.  
John Terry and Rollie Moore present award to the deDoes.

 

We welcome your nominee for the Adaptive Reuse Award. Please call (909) 389-7810.

Conservancy Receives Save Our History Grant From HISTORY™

Special License Plate Frames for Redlands now available Redlands License Plate Frame